Galemmo accused of one of the largest fraud cases in OH history - 19 Action News|Cleveland, OH|News, Weather, Sports

Man facing one of the largest fraud cases in Ohio history

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Furniture seized at Glen Galemmo's home on Wednesday Furniture seized at Glen Galemmo's home on Wednesday
Glen Galemmo (Source: Facebook) Glen Galemmo (Source: Facebook)
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

The U.S. Attorney's Office seized the assets of Glen Galemmo, the Cincinnati investor at the center of an alleged Ponzi Scheme. 

At the same time, attorneys for Galemmo's investors say he could be responsible for the largest fraud in the history of the State of Ohio.

"I've never seen anything quite like this," Attorney Rick Wayne said. The second of two civil lawsuits against Galemmo includes 165 investors from coast to coast. Those investors claim they were bilked of a combined $300 million. 

Until Wednesday, Galemmo lived in East Walnut Hills.  FOX19 filmed that home being emptied by movers while a security guard stood by. 

Until last month, Galemmo operated the Queen City Fund, along with a number of other investment entities. 

Attorneys for his investors say those investment funds were a front for an elaborate Ponzi Scheme.  Attorneys add there also may be reason to believe Galemmo wasn't working alone.

While Galemmo is accused of defrauding investors of millions, attorneys say his lifestyle didn't reflect that. 

"We don't see he lived an extravagant lifestyle. We know he had a home in East Walnut Hills, had an office over on Park Avenue, a condo or piece of a condo in Florida," Wayne said.

The IRS is investigating Galemmo for wire and mail fraud as well as money laundering. They have seized Galemmo's Park Avenue office building as well as more than $330,000 in assets, an amount of money that angers investors.

"I can understand the frustrations of investors who deserve some answers," Galemmo's attorney Ben Dusing said.  

Galemmo has also turned over his passport. Dusing said he and his family left their home and are living with family out of state. 

"He was motivated in part by a concern for his personal safety," Dusing said.

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