Immuneering Corporation Expands Alliance with Bristol-Myers Squibb - 19 Action News|Cleveland, OH|News, Weather, Sports

Immuneering Corporation Expands Alliance with Bristol-Myers Squibb

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SOURCE Immuneering Corporation

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Immuneering Corporation announced today that it has entered into an agreement to expand its existing relationship with Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY) for the use of Immuneering's proprietary computational biology methods to identify biological insights that may facilitate discovery and development of medicines. Terms of agreement were not disclosed.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140129/NE54258LOGO )

"It is a pleasure to expand our collaboration with Bristol-Myers Squibb, said Dr. Ben Zeskind, Immuneering's CEO.  "Medicines that unleash the immune system against cancer have a demonstrated ability to produce, in certain cases, the durable complete responses that cancer patients so urgently need.  We are pleased to help elucidate the mechanisms driving these responses."

Immuneering's team of MIT-trained PhDs will perform advanced analyses on data from Bristol-Myers Squibb to derive new biological insights.  Immuneering uses internally developed proprietary algorithms in combination with software licensed from leading research institutions.

Immuneering's proprietary algorithms extend beyond traditional analysis methods, capturing difficult-to-find signals by analyzing data in ways uniquely aligned with the underlying biological mechanisms.  This enables Immuneering to uncover novel biological information from complex data sets.

About Immuneering Corporation

Immuneering Corporation (http://www.immuneering.com) helps leading pharmaceutical companies use genetic, genomic, and proteomic data to generate biological insights that enhance the clinical and commercial success of medicines.  Immuneering's team of MIT-trained PhDs provides advanced data analysis services using state of the art technologies including proprietary algorithms.  Headquartered in Cambridge, MA, Immuneering is a profitable and growing company with nearly 6 years of experience analyzing data sets ranging from gene expression (microarray) data, to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, to protein concentration data, to clinical meta data, to next-generation sequencing (NGS) data including RNAseq, exome sequencing, and whole genome sequencing.  Using these data sets, Immuneering captures difficult-to-find signals, generates biological hypotheses, and designs follow up studies, contributing to the development of medicines for patients with cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegeneration, and other serious diseases.

CONTACT: Dr. Ben Zeskind, CEO, bzeskind@immuneering.com, 617-500-8080 ext. 121.

Web site: http://www.immuneering.com

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