BioMedical Enterprises, Inc. Defends Intellectual Property - 19 Action News|Cleveland, OH|News, Weather, Sports

BioMedical Enterprises, Inc. Defends Intellectual Property

  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • Latest Health NewsThe Latest from HealthDayMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contact pressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE BME, Inc.

SAN ANTONIO, Jan. 31, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- BioMedical Enterprises, Inc. ("BME"), a San Antonio based medical device company and leader in orthopedic shape memory implants, announced today that it filed a patent infringement lawsuit on January 30, 2014 in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas against Solana Surgical, LLC, a Memphis, Tennessee based company. BME is represented by Fish & Richardson, P.C.

In its complaint, BME alleges that Solana has infringed and continues to infringe United States Patent No. 8,584,853 (the "'853 Patent") through the sale of a line of products, including the Solana FuseFORCE Fixation System.  BME states that it has already been damaged by these acts of infringement and will continue to suffer irreparable injury unless Solana's activities are enjoined.

"Through great effort and ingenuity, BME has secured strong intellectual property rights to cover our unique bone healing technologies, and we will do all in our power to protect those rights," said Keith M. Peeples, President and CEO of BME. 

BME has asked the court to permanently enjoin Solana from further infringing the claims of the '853 patent, require Solana to withdraw from distributing all infringing products, and to award damages adequate to compensate BME for the damages it has suffered as a result of Solana's willful infringement.

BME's implants are fabricated from Nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy, and change shape when exposed to predetermined temperatures to provide fixation of bone or soft tissue to bone.  The implants are provided in sterile ready-to-use packaging for various procedures and markets under the brands: Speed™, HammerLock®, OSStaple™, OSSforce™, and Speed™ Continuous Active Compression System.

About BME, Inc.

BME is a reconstructive bone fusion product company and the worldwide leader in the understanding of memory metal and its orthopedic applications.  BME was the first company to introduce above body temperature shape changing memory metal staples to the U.S. and the first to develop and patent a method of controlling their compressive forces.  From design to manufacturing to marketing, all of BME's operations take place in its home office in San Antonio, Texas. For more information, visit www.bmeortho.com.

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by WorldNow