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Firefighters bake cookies in car to show dangers of heat

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Tuscaloosa firefighters cooked chocolate oatmeal cookies in a car on Wednesday to show how hot it can get inside. Source: WBRC video Tuscaloosa firefighters cooked chocolate oatmeal cookies in a car on Wednesday to show how hot it can get inside. Source: WBRC video
Source: WBRC video Source: WBRC video
Source: WBRC video Source: WBRC video
TUSCALOOSA, AL (WBRC) -

If you think baking cookies in a hot car is just a myth, Tuscaloosa firefighters proved on Wednesday it can be done.

The Tuscaloosa Fire & Rescue Service put chocolate oatmeal cookies inside a car at 11 a.m. and they only took a matter of minutes to cook.

In 15 minutes, the temperature inside the car was 160 degrees. Twenty minutes after that, the first batch of cookies were ready.

The firefighters did the demonstration to make a point about the dangers of excessive heat and the possible repercussions.

The message is especially urgent in light of the death of 22-month-old Cooper Harris who died after being left in a stifling hot car nearly two weeks ago outside of Atlanta.

Cooper's father Ross Harris, from Tuscaloosa, is charged with his murder.

"A day like this is not unusual in Alabama. It's not unusual anywhere in the Southeast, so you should never leave your child in your car not even for one minute," Chief Alan Martin with Tuscaloosa Fire Rescue said.

Rescue personnel say when your body's core temperature reaches 104, you'll more than likely have a heat stroke. At 107, it can possibly kill you.

Just before firefighters wrapped up their cookie demonstration on Wednesday, the temperature inside the car was climbing to nearly 200 degrees.

Tuscaloosa resident Kay McGill dropped by the demonstration and couldn't believe how hot it was inside the car.

"It's amazing how hot a car can get so quickly," McGill said.

McGill, a grandmother who spends a lot of time with her grandchildren, said the cookie demonstration was an eye-opening experience for her.

"It just makes you want to hug them and love them ever more," McGill said. "And be more careful and to keep a look out for other people. And when you go by a car, look in it."

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